OPENING RECEPTION FOR OUR NEW EXHIBIT
By Tiffanie Anderson 
SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 16TH – 3:00PM

Her art is so special, it went viral. In 2018, Tyler Perry and Blue Ivy Carter entered a bidding war at the Wearable Art Gala for this design featuring Sidney Poitier.

Come see her work in person at the opening reception for a new exhibit featuring “The Pretty Artist” Tiffanie Anderson.

WACO Music Valentine’s Day Concert

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 14TH – 8:00PM
WACO will present our season finale of our inaugural music series. Curated and hosted by Jack Davey, this a showcase for artists drawn from the independent music scene who are making an impact. Exciting new artists will be announced soon.

PLAN A: POWER OF HER
SUNDAY, MARCH 1ST – 4:00PM

Calling all women empowered to create! WACO Theater Center and Mpact Events present “Plan A: Power of her.” Submit now for a chance to showcase your short film on Sunday, March 1, 2020. We want to support your film and give you the knowledge and insight from industry professionals. The top rated film will receive a production grant on behalf of M.P.A.C.T Events.

50in50Banner

WACO Theater Center presents

The Billie Holiday Theatre’s

50 IN 50: LETTERS TO OUR SONS

In response to MacArthur “Genius” Dominique Morisseau’s curatorial statement and in partnership with New York’s Billie Holiday Theatre, 50 original monologues – selected from hundreds of submissions from women of African descent from across the globe – will be read by renowned actors.

Buckle Up with

Bershan Shaw

podcast

Breaking Barriers: Richard Lawson

Listen Now!

No Place To Be Somebody Stage Play
Written by Charles Gordone
Directed by Richard Lawson

No Place to be Somebody is a 1969 play written by American playwright Charles Gordone, for which he received the 1970 Pulitzer Prize for Drama. Gordone’s Pulitzer signified two “firsts”: he was the first African-American playwright to receive a Pulitzer, and “No Place to be Somebody” was the first off-Broadway play to receive the award. Written over the course of seven years, the play explores racial tensions in a Civil Rights-era story about a black bar owner who tries to outsmart a white mobster syndicate. In his final speech, Gordone described the play as being “about country folk who had migrated to the big city, seeking the urban myth of success, only to find disappointment, despair, and death.”

VIEW DETAILS